News & Events

CCF in the News

As an active part of the Lewisville Clemmons Community, the following articles highlight the Clemmons Community Foundation in the news. If you would like any additional information regarding our work in the community, our logo, or our logo print guidelines, please contact Sandi Scannelli.

Clemmons Community Foundation Awards Scholarships at West Forsyth High School

Clemmons Community Foundation Awards Scholarships at West Forsyth High School

The Clemmons Community Foundation celebrated six outstanding students at West Forsyth High School's Award's Day on May 22, 2019.

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May 24, 2019
Clemmons Community Foundation Announces the Election of its Board of Director Officers Copy

Clemmons Community Foundation Announces the Election of its Board of Director Officers Copy

New board officers announced to take their positions on July 1, 2019

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May 23, 2019
Rebecca and Danny Green Music Scholarship

Rebecca and Danny Green Music Scholarship

One of the most gratifying aspects of being a teacher is knowing that you have had a lasting impact on students long after they have left your classroom. Danny and Becky Green, two career music teachers, have had such an impact on hundreds of their students during their careers that have spanned decades.

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May 23, 2019
Clemmons Community Clothing Closet

Clemmons Community Clothing Closet

An Interfaith ministry of Caring of the Clemmons Community, the Community Clothes Closet at Centenary United Methodist Church kicked off in late December 2018. For more information, please review the flyer below or call 336-766-5897

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May 24, 2019
Clemmons Community Foundation Awards Grants to Community

Clemmons Community Foundation Awards Grants to Community

Clemmons Community Foundation announces more than $35,000 in community grants

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May 24, 2019
“Big Buddy” Program Begins in Clemmons With Grant From CCF

“Big Buddy” Program Begins in Clemmons With Grant From CCF

Elementary aged students matched with a student mentor from West Forsyth High School. (Pictured above Big Hannah and Little Victoria).

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January 10, 2019

Grantees in the News

A collection of news articles and features that show the work of our community’s non-profits that are collaborating with the Clemmons Community Foundation and making a difference.

Summer Learning Academy: A Program of the YMCA of Northwest NC

Ward Elementary School, located at 3775 Fraternity Church Road, is joining seven other schools in Forsyth County who offer the Summer Learning Academy program. This program is designed to keep the participating students on track to maintain and/or improve their academic growth; the program closes the gap between the school years and sustains learning from one school year to the next. Students are selected by their school’s principal to participate in the program based on their academic needs.

Relevant Community News

A methadone overdose killed this West Forsyth student. A scholarship honors his memory.

CLEMMONS — In the ideal world, the one where kids heed warnings about drugs and no parent ever buries a child, Mason Hunter would be battling senioritis in his final semester at West Forsyth High School. In between marathon Xbox sessions with his buddies, he would think about his future, weighing two choices that appealed to him the most: chef or state trooper? Shauna and Brad Hunter would be talking about the best way to support their quick-witted, tenderhearted middle child. It didn’t work out that way.

Early on March 4, 2018, the ideal world was shattered by a scream for help from Mason’s bedroom. A friend spending the night looked over at Mason. He was unresponsive. At some point, the night before he died, someone gave Mason liquid methadone.
The Hunters have been told that Mason thought he was taking cough syrup. “He had a one-time accidental overdose,” Shauna explained. “Mason didn’t do heroin. I mean, he didn’t like to drink. So I don’t know why he thought he needed to do that. But that’s what happened.”

Methadone is a synthetic opiate that is used to relieve pain. It is often used to treat opioid addiction. When taken properly, it can reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms. After taking the methadone, Mason vomited and became sleepy, the friends told the Hunters the next day. Some time later, he died of an overdose. He was 17. With that one-time, reckless decision, Mason’s story was folded into the national opioid epidemic. Though statistics have not been released for 2018, the number of overdose deaths is expected to rival the more than 70,000 who died in 2017. Of those, 68 percent involved opioids.

To read more from this Winston-Salem Journal Article, go to https://bit.ly/2VlrNMy