News & Events

CCF in the News

As an active part of the Lewisville Clemmons Community, the following articles highlight the Clemmons Community Foundation in the news. If you would like any additional information regarding our work in the community, our logo, or our logo print guidelines, please contact the foundation's President and CEO, Sandi Scannelli.

Announcing New Board Officers and Directors for 2020-2021

Announcing New Board Officers and Directors for 2020-2021

The foundation has elected its officers for the 2020-2021 fiscal year and welcomes five new members.

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July 1, 2020
Inspiring Community: IFB Solutions

Inspiring Community: IFB Solutions

IFB is inspiring new dreams and empowering opportunities for those with blindness or vision loss to be fully involved in their communities, from school to home and beyond, as they lead active, independent lives.

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June 4, 2020
Inspiring Community: Clemmons Fire Department

Inspiring Community: Clemmons Fire Department

To all firefighters, thank you for your courage and selflessness when everything is on the line. Thank you for being one of our protectors, safeguarding our lives with your own.

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May 14, 2020
Yadkin County Schools' teachers recognized

Yadkin County Schools' teachers recognized

This week, with thanks to Indera Mills Co. and Yadkin County’s COVID-19 Response Team, every public school teacher in Yadkin County will receive a face mask with the Yadkin County Schools’ logo.

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May 6, 2020
First round of COVID-19 grants awarded

First round of COVID-19 grants awarded

Nearly $10,000 has been awarded to organizations in Clemmons-Lewisville and Yadkin County for emerging needs due to the impact of COVID-19.

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May 5, 2020
Clemmons Feeds Clemmons — and beyond

Clemmons Feeds Clemmons — and beyond

A resident-led initiative is assisting neighbors and supporting locally owned restaurants.

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April 30, 2020
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Grantees in the News

A collection of news articles and features that show the work of our community’s non-profits that are collaborating with the Clemmons Community Foundation and making a difference.

Lexi Scoggin: Clemmons and Lewisville's New Community Engagement Facilitator

Lexi Scoggin is hitting the ground running in her new position as community engagement facilitator in a grant-funded partnership between the Clemmons Community Foundation, the Interfaith Alliance, and Faith Health Innovations. She works closely with schools and faith organizations in the Clemmons-Lewisville area to establish community relationships in order to better meet the food, clothing, mentoring, and education needs in the area.

Read more from the Clemmons Courier.

Relevant Community News

A methadone overdose killed this West Forsyth student. A scholarship honors his memory.

CLEMMONS — In the ideal world, the one where kids heed warnings about drugs and no parent ever buries a child, Mason Hunter would be battling senioritis in his final semester at West Forsyth High School. In between marathon Xbox sessions with his buddies, he would think about his future, weighing two choices that appealed to him the most: chef or state trooper? Shauna and Brad Hunter would be talking about the best way to support their quick-witted, tenderhearted middle child. It didn’t work out that way.

Early on March 4, 2018, the ideal world was shattered by a scream for help from Mason’s bedroom. A friend spending the night looked over at Mason. He was unresponsive. At some point, the night before he died, someone gave Mason liquid methadone.
The Hunters have been told that Mason thought he was taking cough syrup. “He had a one-time accidental overdose,” Shauna explained. “Mason didn’t do heroin. I mean, he didn’t like to drink. So I don’t know why he thought he needed to do that. But that’s what happened.”

Methadone is a synthetic opiate that is used to relieve pain. It is often used to treat opioid addiction. When taken properly, it can reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms. After taking the methadone, Mason vomited and became sleepy, the friends told the Hunters the next day. Some time later, he died of an overdose. He was 17. With that one-time, reckless decision, Mason’s story was folded into the national opioid epidemic. Though statistics have not been released for 2018, the number of overdose deaths is expected to rival the more than 70,000 who died in 2017. Of those, 68 percent involved opioids.

Read more from the Winston-Salem Journal