News & Events

CCF in the News

As an active part of the Lewisville Clemmons Community, the following articles highlight the Clemmons Community Foundation in the news. If you would like any additional information regarding our work in the community, our logo, or our logo print guidelines, please contact the foundation's President and CEO, Sandi Scannelli.

Help for local small businesses, nonprofits and self-employed

Help for local small businesses, nonprofits and self-employed

Together with the Forsyth Tech Small Business Center and the Lewisville-Clemmons Chamber of Commerce, we've put together a team of business professionals from a variety of fields, as well as Small Business mentors, to offer assistance navigating COVID-19 resources.

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April 22, 2020
Foundation awards more than $80,000 in community grants

Foundation awards more than $80,000 in community grants

$82,709 in grants have been awarded to twelve nonprofit organizations through the foundation's recent community grant awards cycle.

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April 7, 2020
COVID-19 Local Response Funds established

COVID-19 Local Response Funds established

We value our nonprofit community and the work they do every day. We also understand that the impact of the pandemic is hitting hard. We have established two COVID-19 local response funds to help the communities we serve – a fund serving Clemmons and Lewisville and a fund serving Yadkin County.

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March 17, 2020
 Salem Glen offers college assistance program

Salem Glen offers college assistance program

An active and charitably-minded community creates college assistance program that provides tuition assistance and mentoring.

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January 16, 2020
Cancer Services Endowment Fund launches in celebration of their 65th Anniversary

Cancer Services Endowment Fund launches in celebration of their 65th Anniversary

One word…just one word compels a response that cuts through all differences in background, socio-economic status, occupation race, religion, or any other potential divide. That word is cancer.

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January 8, 2020
Steve and Anne Sessions

Steve and Anne Sessions

When you mention the names Steve or Anne Sessions, expressions of regard quickly soften eyes and broaden smiles. Few people engender such esteem throughout decades of life and business interactions.

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November 6, 2019

Grantees in the News

A collection of news articles and features that show the work of our community’s non-profits that are collaborating with the Clemmons Community Foundation and making a difference.

Lexi Scoggin: Clemmons and Lewisville's New Community Engagement Facilitator

Lexi Scoggin is hitting the ground running in her new position as community engagement facilitator in a grant-funded partnership between the Clemmons Community Foundation, the Interfaith Alliance, and Faith Health Innovations. She works closely with schools and faith organizations in the Clemmons-Lewisville area to establish community relationships in order to better meet the food, clothing, mentoring, and education needs in the area.

Read more from the Clemmons Courier.

Relevant Community News

A methadone overdose killed this West Forsyth student. A scholarship honors his memory.

CLEMMONS — In the ideal world, the one where kids heed warnings about drugs and no parent ever buries a child, Mason Hunter would be battling senioritis in his final semester at West Forsyth High School. In between marathon Xbox sessions with his buddies, he would think about his future, weighing two choices that appealed to him the most: chef or state trooper? Shauna and Brad Hunter would be talking about the best way to support their quick-witted, tenderhearted middle child. It didn’t work out that way.

Early on March 4, 2018, the ideal world was shattered by a scream for help from Mason’s bedroom. A friend spending the night looked over at Mason. He was unresponsive. At some point, the night before he died, someone gave Mason liquid methadone.
The Hunters have been told that Mason thought he was taking cough syrup. “He had a one-time accidental overdose,” Shauna explained. “Mason didn’t do heroin. I mean, he didn’t like to drink. So I don’t know why he thought he needed to do that. But that’s what happened.”

Methadone is a synthetic opiate that is used to relieve pain. It is often used to treat opioid addiction. When taken properly, it can reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms. After taking the methadone, Mason vomited and became sleepy, the friends told the Hunters the next day. Some time later, he died of an overdose. He was 17. With that one-time, reckless decision, Mason’s story was folded into the national opioid epidemic. Though statistics have not been released for 2018, the number of overdose deaths is expected to rival the more than 70,000 who died in 2017. Of those, 68 percent involved opioids.

Read more from the Winston-Salem Journal